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PORTLAND, Maine(NEWS CENTER)-- Peregrine Falcons suffered significantly because of DDT spraying. Still one of the most regionally diverse raptors, they are making a comeback in Maine thanks to the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and the Biodiversity Research Institute.

Peregrine are traditionally cliff-dwellers although in recent years they have occasionally nest on tall buildings or bridges. They are crow sized, between a foot and two feet in height. The females are larger than the males by as much as a third.

They eat medium sized birds and perhaps smaller rodents.

There are 25 nesting pairs in Maine. The Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and the Biodiversity Research Institute are working together to learn more about these exciting raptors.

A pair moving onto a southern Maine bridge gave the two organizations a chance to learn more about the birds. The male was born in Manchester, New Hampshire in 2008. They have three offspring which were banded on May 13.

The babies were 21 days old making them big enough to handle the band, but small enough for biologists to handle. As the biologists led a group to the site, the parents raised a fuss, frequently diving on the journalists.

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